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Message started by New Cairoite on Mar 10th, 2008 at 11:40am

Title: Cairo Stats - Why aren't we producing geniuses?
Post by New Cairoite on Mar 10th, 2008 at 11:40am
Reading      Math      Students
per teacher      
     Cairo Junior/Senior High School
4201 Sycamore Street
Cairo, IL 62914      7-12      47.4%      43.4%      12.7
     Bennett Elementary School
434 18th Street
Cairo, IL 62914      3-6      56.4%      70.4%      12.7
     Emerson Elementary School
3101 Elm Street
Cairo, IL 62914      PreK-2      n.a.      n.a.      12.1
                             
With 12.X students per teacher, why are we not producing geniuses in our schools?

Just for the heck of it, I checked out the city where my daughter went to school:  99.0% 99.0% 22.9. Almost 2x as many students per teacher and look at the difference in the test scores.

So, smaller class sizes are not the answer. When I ask about certain teachers I have heard of, I am told they are excellent teachers. I asked someone connected to the school about Isom and was told he did a great job, but the school board wouldn't let him do what needed to be done.

We can't blame class size. According to those I talked to, we can't blame the teachers or the superintendent. We have all heard of Marva Collins and what she was able to do in Chicago. Her bio says, "That little girl who had been labeled as border line retarded (by the public schools), graduated in 1976 from college Summa Cum Laude. It was documented on the 60 Minutes programs in 1996. Marva’s graduates have entered some of the nation’s finest colleges and universities, such as Harvard, Yale, and Stanford, to mention just a few. And, they have become physicians, lawyers, engineers, educators, and entered other professions."

Marva proved "it can be done". Why isn't Cairo doing it? Is the current school board commited to doing it? Are there any truly commited teachers and, if so, why is it not being done? Marva was just one person and she really made a difference in so many lives, not just the students, but ours. Your next successful surgery may be done by one of her students and you may have a very personal reason to appreciate her belief in those kids.

Thank you "dragon-in-hiding" for the reference.

Title: Re: Cairo Stats - Why aren't we producing geniuses
Post by New Cairoite on Mar 10th, 2008 at 11:49am
Oh, I forgot! It's the parents! It's the poverty! It is whatever we can blame it on without having to do anything about it. It is whatever makes us feel good. It may be the parents and the poverty that makes the difference. So, you take that limitation and overcome it!

Do I need to remind you that in every profession, there is someone who graduated at the bottom of their class? Do you want someone who graduated from Cairo High or Marva Collins Prep doing your surgery? Or, treating you when you are taken to the emergency room unconscious and unable to ask where they went to school?

We all have a tremendous vested interest in graduating Marva Collins quality students. The Cairo stats are a reflection on the community, just like the Orinda stats.

Title: Re: Cairo Stats - Why aren't we producing geniuses
Post by Ice-P on Mar 10th, 2008 at 1:13pm
I compared the stats for Cairo, Meridian and Egyptian at schoolmatters.com.  Cairo (not to defend the low scores) did better than the other two schools.  So it's not just Cairo, it's the whole area.

Title: Re: Cairo Stats - Why aren't we producing geniuses
Post by still_here on Mar 10th, 2008 at 3:08pm
Years ago St. Joe had one teacher (nun) with two classes in one room (1-2),(3-4),(5-6) & (7-8) with anywhere from 18-25 kids in each class.  So one room would have maybe 30-50 students in it.  Yet they always scored one of the highest in math and did well in reading.  So I've never bought the "we need smaller classes".

You need teachers that care, parents that expect and kids wanting to learn.

Title: Re: Cairo Stats - Why aren't we producing geniuses
Post by New Cairoite on Mar 10th, 2008 at 3:20pm
Ice-P, take a look at Mounds! The scores in Cairo could certainly be a whole lot worse.

I don't know if you have children. If you did, would you ask that they be just as good as the other kids in class or ask them to do their very best? Why not ask them to strive for excellence? Excellence in everything. If you go out and watch a kid's ball game, you will see parents yelling at their kids and really pushing them to score. I wonder if those same parents ask the same academic achievement of those kids. From my experience, they do not.

Title: Re: Cairo Stats - Why aren't we producing geniuses
Post by New Cairoite on Mar 10th, 2008 at 3:36pm
Still-here - teachers, parents, kids - that sounds like a community, a community committed to a better education system in Cairo. A community that will benefit from any improvements it makes. Can we learn from Marva? I recall reading her book about 10 years ago. Can we support the parents, demand more from our teachers and instill a love of learning in young children? Most libraries have programs for young children. How many children are in the school? I think you suggested separating boys and girls. Have you heard from any of the school board members indicating they would support that idea? I think, from my experience, it is a great idea.

People "adopt" families at Christmas time and buy them presents. Could we do something similar in the school with school sponsorship? Do we need a Big Brother/Big Sister program in Cairo? If each one of us sponsored or worked with one student, we could make all the difference in the world.

Or, maybe there is a Marva wanna-be in Cairo. Does IL law provide for charter schools?

Cairo is really a very special place with special people. Our kids deserve the best and the best anyone can give them is the opportunity and education to be whatever they want to be. They need to know anything is possible.

Title: Re: Cairo Stats - Why aren't we producing geniuses
Post by New Cairoite on Mar 10th, 2008 at 4:58pm
Just a couple more thoughts! Like Still_here, I don't think class size matters, either. When we were kids, we were packed in like sardines. If a new student came, they always found room for another desk.

I was reminded of a school bond request about 10 years ago. Teachers came out and said, in public, that if they got paid better, they would do better, the students would do better, scores would be better, etc. I wrote a letter to the editor with my observation that we, in the private sector, would get fired if we went to our bosses and said that we knew we weren't doing our jobs, but that if he/she gave us a raise, we would start performing the job we were already paid to do.

I recall checking and Marva Collin's teachers were paid about half of what that district's poorly performing public school teachers were getting paid.

Eventually, the state came in and took over that district. What does it take for the state in IL to step in?

Title: Re: Cairo Stats - Why aren't we producing geniuses
Post by still_here on Mar 10th, 2008 at 5:56pm
Exactly!

Teachers at private schools usually are always paid less than their counterparts in public schools.  Yet they prefer to work in the private sector because of the positive environment.

Title: Re: Cairo Stats - Why aren't we producing geniuses
Post by Madasher on Mar 11th, 2008 at 12:47am
I would like to know how many of you on this board have sent their children to the local schools?  There is an excellent question for you.  Yes, you are concerned, yet are you concerned enough to send your own children to our local public schools and get involved in the schools?

I have said this before and I will say it again.  If you do not have a vested interest in something, you cannot properly support it.  I sent my daughter to Cairo High.  She graduated from there.  I was called in one day to the assistant principle's office.  When he came in, he asked who I was, I said daughters name and I was her mother.  He looked shocked, and exclaimed, that explained a lot. He told me that people that have any other options at all do not send their children there.  They were profiling students there, and the ones that had designer clothing, gold and diamond jewelry were assumed to be dealing drugs.

That is showing what the impression is by the people that run the school of their students.  If that is their impression, what will they teach?


You can give me flack on this, but I sent my child to the public school here, and this is what I dealt with.  In a word, they told me anyone that had any money did not send their children there.  


So,I ask you again, how many of you sent your children to our local schools and tried to make a difference, or were you afraid that they would just fall through the cracks?

It is time for the people of this community to take control of the school, control of our streets.  This is your community, you are the ones to change it.

Title: Re: Cairo Stats - Why aren't we producing geniuses
Post by carla on Mar 11th, 2008 at 10:44am
When parents send their kids to "better" schools it really messes things up. It's done everywhere. I was the only parent on my block in Rock Island to send my kids to the local grade school. Fifteen other kids on our block went to the better schools on top of the hill. In almost every case the parents gave bogus excuses for having to send their kids to a different school.

Anyway, that happens everywhere. But it doesn't mean that CHS has to necessarily fail. It means that in order for it to succeed, it needs to learn from the successes of other schools similarly situated. And there are many, many examples of schools with predominantly low income students (many living in homes with substance abuse) that have found what works.

Learn from the successes of others! It's done in art, music, business, science...the school board needs to read up on WHAT WORKS. Then implement the changes.

Beginning with school uniforms:)

Title: Re: Cairo Stats - Why aren't we producing geniuses
Post by still_here on Mar 11th, 2008 at 11:49am

carla wrote on Mar 11th, 2008 at 10:44am:
When parents send their kids to "better" schools it really messes things up. It's done everywhere. I was the only parent on my block in Rock Island to send my kids to the local grade school. Fifteen other kids on our block went to the better schools on top of the hill. In almost every case the parents gave bogus excuses for having to send their kids to a different school.

Anyway, that happens everywhere. But it doesn't mean that CHS has to necessarily fail. It means that in order for it to succeed, it needs to learn from the successes of other schools similarly situated. And there are many, many examples of schools with predominantly low income students (many living in homes with substance abuse) that have found what works.

Learn from the successes of others! It's done in art, music, business, science...the school board needs to read up on WHAT WORKS. Then implement the changes.

Beginning with school uniforms:)


Parents that send their children to private schools are not messes things up but keeping the public schools on there toes!  When you do not have competition you lose your edge.  Ten years ago teachers would have been competing with St. Joe students when they entered high school and they tried harder to prepare the students.  

I have had a child in Cairo schools until a teacher told me to make a change if I wanted them to succeed later in life.

Title: Re: Cairo Stats - Why aren't we producing geniuses
Post by still_here on Mar 11th, 2008 at 12:22pm
I went to Cairo High School so when a teacher I knew and respected told me it wasn't like when I went years ago and to take my child out of the public schools, I did.  :(

Did you ever ask how teachers live here and send their children to Cairo Schools?  ::)

Title: Re: Cairo Stats - Why aren't we producing geniuses
Post by dragon in hiding on Mar 11th, 2008 at 2:40pm
I rechecked the site schoolmatters.com and they sure have dumbed it down since I checked it two weeks ago.  Then they broke it down by grade and all sorts of different aspects.  I have found another site that is like the old schoolmatters.com site.  If you really want to know about the school go to greatschools.net and check out the 11th grade scores.  Cairo ranks a 2 out of 10 on the school chart.  Just for fun I looked up my growing up town of Ozark Arkansas and it ranked a 7 out of 10.   Ozark spends less money per student and has more students per teacher and has higher scores so money is not the main issue.   Ozark's size is just a few hundred people more than Cairo, it also is a river town.

Title: Re: Cairo Stats - Why aren't we producing geniuses
Post by New Cairoite on Mar 11th, 2008 at 4:04pm
I think this is a great discussion. It is a first step. I hope something positive comes out of it.

All of us talking here, whether we have kids in the public school or not, care about the quality of education currently provided there, the education systems around the country. I think we all recognize that we are affected now and it affects our future. It is not in society's best interest for children to not be well-educated. We have a vested interest, whether or not we have children in the local school.

I have to disagree with some of you. My first obligation is to my child. My second obligation is to other's children and the community. I do not have young children. But, I think the school is the biggest problem in Cairo and am willing to put a lot of energy into improving it. I cannot do it alone, but together we can do it. Criticising each other for choices we made about our precious children's education serves no productive purpose.

Let's share ideas on what we need to do. I do not know who Still-here is, but he/she/it seems very concerned and looking for a way to help. It sounds like that is what we all want. Cairo is really not a bad place. Those test scores are not that bad. With a little effort, we could make Cairo schools a model for the rest of the country.

Does anyone agree?

Title: Re: Cairo Stats - Why aren't we producing geniuses
Post by carla on Mar 12th, 2008 at 8:56am

Quote:
Parents that send their children to private schools are not messes things up but keeping the public schools on there toes!  When you do not have competition you lose your edge.  Ten years ago teachers would have been competing with St. Joe students when they entered high school and they tried harder to prepare the students.  

I have had a child in Cairo schools until a teacher told me to make a change if I wanted them to succeed later in life.


I'm not saying I blame them TODAY for doing it. It was those who jumped ship long ago who created the imbalance. White flight is what I'm talking about. It happened in the 60's as whites moved to the suburbs (now they are returning to the "historic districts"; displacing thousands of low-income through gentrification) and it's still happening today in our schools.

I don't recommend that a parent send their kids to their local school because it's the right thing to do. I did that in Rock Island & it was not in my kids' best interest. What we have to do now is improve Cairo High School to the point that those attending other schools will return. Or those new in town will feel comfortable sending their kids there.

What those statistics do not tell you is the level of violence at the school. Until that is addressed, nothing else can be improved. Ignoring threats and cussing by students is contributing to the problem.

Title: Re: Cairo Stats - Why aren't we producing geniuses
Post by still_here on Mar 12th, 2008 at 12:31pm
Short history lesson 101:  Cairo had large migration of Irish & German immigrants in the mid to late 1800’s.  Most were of the Catholic faith and went to Mass 7 times a week.  Many of our parents/grandparents & great-grandparents not only went to St. Joseph grade school but also graduated from St. Joe High School.  During this same time period you had all white grade schools & all white Cairo High School, all black grade schools and all black Sumner High School.  You went to St. Joe to learn not just the 3 R’s but your catechism lessons and pre 1963 Latin to understand what was being said at mass.  Catholic churches rarely had/have bible study classes because you went to a Catholic school and had religion class everyday for 20-30 minutes plus going to mass each morning before classes. It was not a racial separation but a religious one.  Pre 1960’s it was just about unheard of to marry outside of your catholic faith.  Yet all this time you paid your property taxes so others less fortunate not to belong to your church could get at least some form of an education as it were.

Title: Re: Cairo Stats - Why aren't we producing geniuses
Post by New Cairoite on Mar 12th, 2008 at 12:54pm
Carla, thanks for acknowledging that the decision about a child's education is very personal. You look at a bad school and have to ask yourself whether or not it is in your child's best interest to be there everyday while you TRY to improve it. You also have to look at your child. Some of our children do better in a smaller pond.

How many of us would like to see a lot of things change in government, but think there is nothing we can do about it? And, is there?? We recognize that we are just one voice and think we are alone. Can any of us stand outside any school and honestly believe we have any say over what goes on inside, any say over the actions of the principal and teachers?

There are other ways to deal with the effects of that imbalance. All kids are bored by the time they reach 17. I recall my nerd child's Russian teacher told me she skipped class. I was very upset with her until she told me she was bored and went to the library; she is an avid reader. I would like to see high school stop at the tenth or eleventh grade with two years of mandatory conscription. I recall the days of the military draft. It was great because you took young men from all socio-economic levels, dressed them the same, gave them the same haircuts, paid them the same, etc. It was amazing, after three years,  to see the difference in both the rich kids and the poor kids. They benefited each other so much. It would have been difficult in the end to look at them or talk to them and tell whether they were raised in Baverly Hills or East LA. Conscription could do the same thing for all kids.

The answer is out there and we all know it is not going to be found in attacking each other. We have to identify, quantify and attack the problem.

Title: Re: Cairo Stats - Why aren't we producing geniuses
Post by carla on Mar 12th, 2008 at 5:05pm
Regarding "Short history lesson 101," Cairo had a relatively small Catholic population always, I'm assuming. The Catholics here weren't the only whites who did not send their kids to CHS.

That doesn't even matter. I know what I saw in Rock Island on my all white block. It was in a neighborhood undergoing a transformation. The yuppy whites were returning to the big, beautiful Victorian homes downtown, but didn't want their kids going to the integrated local grade school. It's been happening all over the country for a couple decades.

Title: Re: Cairo Stats - Why aren't we producing geniuses
Post by still_here on Mar 12th, 2008 at 5:11pm
Nope, you are wrong.  We had three Catholic Churches at one time.  One built by Germans/St. Joseph, one built by Irish/ St. Patrick, one built for black & white/ St. Columbus.  Blacks from St. Columbus also went to St. Joe Schools.

Title: Re: Cairo Stats - Why aren't we producing geniuses
Post by carla on Mar 12th, 2008 at 5:20pm
Then who was going to the all-white high school? Where did all the whites go? We're getting off topic. Which was about the scores.

Title: Re: Cairo Stats - Why aren't we producing geniuses
Post by New Cairoite on Mar 12th, 2008 at 5:54pm
First, for my history lesson - where were the three churches and when did the other two close?

Second, let's talk about race! We need to dialogue a lot more about race than what we do. Only open dialogue and understanding will change the problems we have with race in Cairo and this entire great country we live in.

So far, one person you all know told me Cairo does not have a race problem. One old black man most of you know told me he doesn't trust and hates all white people. One old white man many of you will probably know told me he is a racist.

Carla, it appears to me you assume white people with enough money prefer to not send their kids to local public schools with black children. I know there are racists out there, but my experience with the people you refer to who gentrify inner-city areas (both black and white) will send their kids to local public schools if they are good. Berkeley CA is a perfect example. In my hometown in Michigan, when the whites started moving back into the grand old homes in the inner city, they sent their kids to public schools. The sad thing is most of the inner city public schools (yes, because of white flight of the 60's) are not cared for, do not have the greatest tax base, do not always have the best teachers, etc. No one wants their kids to go to those schools. Some parents do not have a choice. My black neighbors in Cairo drove their kids to Cape to school. Most parents want to give their kids the best they can. I believe for most of the parents of this generation, it is not because of race. Your complaint with Cairo High is not the black  children; it is that the kids and teachers are out of control. That would be most parents complaint. If a wealthy white parent walked into a clean, safe school where the teachers and kids were acting respectfully, they would have no problem putting their precious children in that school. They wouldn't see color; they would see quality.

Title: Re: Cairo Stats - Why aren't we producing geniuses
Post by still_here on Mar 12th, 2008 at 6:16pm
Sumner High School is were the Senior Citizen Nutrition Center/Happy Days is located now.  Cairo high was torn down when they built the new high school but it use to be to the right of Cairo Jr. High on the corner of 26 & MLK.  St. Joe High School used to be next to the St. Joe gym but was torn down years ago along with the church.  When they say mass down stairs at St. Pat's they call it St. Joseph chapel.  St. Columbus was used during the riots in Cairo was turned down, think it was on the 400 block of 14th. street.

Scores?  Have you ever talked to anyone that went to Sumner High?  I would take their test scores any day over Cairo High School today.  When both school went together in the late 60's many of their teacher then started working at Cairo High and were some of the best!  They cared because they lived in this community and it reflected on them how well each student did.

Yes Camelot was created when the two schools merged because of race.  Many whites were afraid of the blacks because of the riots and gun fire.  Now there is no longer a Camelot and we are all in this together to make what we have better.  Let's move on.

Your turn New Cairoite.  8-)

Title: Re: Cairo Stats - Why aren't we producing geniuses
Post by New Cairoite on Mar 12th, 2008 at 7:19pm
Thank you!

I wish you could all see Cairo through my eyes. There is so much good in Cairo that you will not find anyplace else in this country with the same demographics. It would be so easy to turn Cairo around.

Cairo has the same problem other small towns across the country have. Most of the people who were raised and chose to stay in the town are doing fine; they have jobs with the local utility, school district, state or local government or own local businesses. Unfortunately, their children cannot stay in the town because the jobs are career jobs for their parents' generation. But, they are doing fine and it is hard to get them to tackle a problem because the cause of the problem is their relative or friend.

I do not know what to do about that. Any thoughts?

Back to the school! The school is something we should be able to do something about. The majority of us in Cairo care. There may be some parents who do not know they need to care about their children's education; I can see that. But, there have to be a fair number of grandparents raising their grandkids who went to Sumner High and want their grandkids to get a quality education and not get messed up with drugs.

Carla posted a great article. Some of the school board members will read it here. I think we need to send them a copy and ask when they are going to do the same here. With a little effort, we should be able to get some parents and other residents to a school board meeting to make some demands.

The internet is a powerful medium. Posting their positions and naming names on the internet may shame them into doing something good.

Does anyone have any of the board member's pre-election propaganda pieces? Did any of them state any positions, offer any solutions, make us any promises, even acknowledge there is a problem?

I heard one say they didn't think there was a problem at the high school. I would like them to explain the low test scores if there is no problem there!


Title: Re: Cairo Stats - Why aren't we producing geniuses
Post by New Cairoite on Mar 12th, 2008 at 7:27pm
Who is the new superintendent? I am not in Cairo to buy the paper to find out.

Let's do our own background investigation on him/her and post it here and distribute it around town. If the school board did not make a good decision, AGAIN, we need to know now, not after another year or two. Our kids in Cairo deserve the best! Let's see now if they are going to get it.

It is amazing how these superintendents get recycled around the country, no matter how bad they are! A superintendent in CA that left when the state came in and took over the school went on to another large school district with a hefty increase in pay. And, the new school district knew of his history.

Title: Re: Cairo Stats - Why aren't we producing geniuses
Post by carla on Mar 12th, 2008 at 8:44pm

Quote:
Does anyone have any of the board member's pre-election propaganda pieces? Did any of them state any positions, offer any solutions, make us any promises, even acknowledge there is a problem?


Eight seeking three Cairo school seats

By Mark Bliss ~ Southeast Missourian

CAIRO, Ill. -- Some Cairo school board candidates feel the school district is making strides both financially and academically. But others say major changes are needed to improve the school system. Two incumbents and six challengers are running for three seats on the school board in Tuesday's election.

The field of candidates is made up of board members Arnold Burris Sr. and Vernon Stubblefield, as well as challengers Bobby Mayberry, Mary Coleman, Delbert Irish, Erica Wells, Owen Terry Jr. and Torey Purchase.

Burris, a deputy sheriff for Alexander County, has served 16 years on the school board, currently serving as board president. He's seeking his fifth four-year term.

Stubblefield was appointed to fill a vacancy on the board in January. He previously served two terms on the board.

Voters will decide the direction of a school district where many families are burdened by poverty and some students struggle to make the grade.

Candidate Delbert Irish said, "The school system is in a bad way right now."

Irish, a construction worker, graduated from Cairo High School. So did his sisters and his children.

"I want the school to get back to the way it used to be," he said, adding he wants to see improved test scores and more parental involvement.

"I don't think they are involved enough with the system right now," he said.

Continued below...

Title: Re: Cairo Stats - Why aren't we producing geniuses
Post by carla on Mar 12th, 2008 at 8:46pm
Coleman, a retired school employee, agrees change is needed. "I think our priorities have gotten mixed up in that it is no longer children first," she said.

The school district's administration currently includes a superintendent and a high school principal who don't live in Cairo. Coleman said hiring administrators who live elsewhere sends the wrong message.

"We can't expect somebody else to come in," she said. "We need to start investing in our own people and promoting from within."

Wells, Cairo city clerk, said the district needs to do a better job of reaching out to parents, in part by directing them to agencies and organizations that can provide assistance.

"Most of the time it is parents who have needs, and the child suffers," she said.

Candidate Bobby Mayberry said he isn't looking to change the way everything is done in the district, but he'd like to see improved communication between city and school officials. Mayberry, Alexander County's 911 emergency coordinator, said he's well-acquainted with city officials and could help bridge the communication gap.

Mayberry said he's seen improvements in the schools. "Throughout the school system, our academics have been improving for several years," he said. Cairo junior high and high school students made adequate yearly progress in test scores this school year, meeting the requirements of the federal No Child Left Behind Act.

"For a long time we expected our kids to fail," Mayberry said. "I think that is changing. I want to continue to see that changed."

Stubblefield, who works for a social services organization in addiction prevention, said he wants to continue serving on the school board. A graduate of the district, he said he wants to help the students.

"I have a very strong desire to see the youth of this community succeed because they are good children," he said. "I think they accomplish a lot considering the lack of resources available to them."

continued below....

Title: Re: Cairo Stats - Why aren't we producing geniuses
Post by carla on Mar 12th, 2008 at 8:47pm
Burris said the school district has overcome financial troubles. "Now we are in the black and students are showing progress," he said.

"I want to continue what we started," said Burris, adding that he wants to be involved in the hiring of a new superintendent.

Terry and Purchase couldn't be reached for comment.


From:
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Title: Re: Cairo Stats - Why aren't we producing geniuses
Post by New Cairoite on Mar 12th, 2008 at 8:54pm
Carla, thank you. I really appreciate you bringing me up to speed and I am sure others are very interested in this information.

Bobby said stats are improving. That is not what I read. Did I misinterpret something?

Title: Re: Cairo Stats - Why aren't we producing geniuses
Post by carla on Mar 12th, 2008 at 9:07pm
They are improving. See the graphic I just posted. They improved quite a bit since I arrived=))  ;D

Title: Re: Cairo Stats - Why aren't we producing geniuses
Post by New Cairoite on Mar 12th, 2008 at 9:33pm
Thanks, I will try to find time tomorrow to take a closer look. To what do you contribute the improvement?

Title: Re: Cairo Stats - Why aren't we producing geniuses
Post by carla on Mar 12th, 2008 at 9:42pm
I hope a small part of it was because of the internet & Cairo Gate. For the kids, because just putting their photos online gave them some pride & legitimacy. Perhaps the teachers & admins stepped up their pace a bit knowing they were being watched.

Did you ever read this?

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It's shocking. I believe they have curbed that practice quite a bit.

Maltbia, the former principal, became their scapegoat, but he did introduce improvements. And this year the Delta Center has student mentors/counselors there.

Title: Re: Cairo Stats - Why aren't we producing geniuses
Post by New Cairoite on Mar 13th, 2008 at 11:07am
What has happened since then? Thanks.

Title: Re: Cairo Stats - Why aren't we producing geniuses
Post by carla on Mar 13th, 2008 at 1:11pm
Like I said, I believe they have curbed their penchant for suspensions. The kid who keeps assaulting my son & threatening him hasn't been suspended, yet he started doing it the first day of school this year. But assaults are what they should have reserved suspensions for=/

I wanted to show you this link to a site about 144 schools that show 15 years of progress. This caught my eye on the front page:

"State law mandates all Local School Council Members to take 18 hours of training to efffectively carry out their duties."

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Do our school board members have the 18 hours? What's the statute?

Title: Re: Cairo Stats - Why aren't we producing geniuses
Post by New Cairoite on Mar 13th, 2008 at 2:02pm
I am still searching for the statute. But, came across some other things.

Were you given a student discipline policy? Is there a parent-teacher advisory committee? Who is on it?

Title: Re: Cairo Stats - Why aren't we producing geniuses
Post by New Cairoite on Mar 13th, 2008 at 8:01pm
Carla, others who care....

I just ordered the Illinois School Code and Related Acts. It comes with a cd. I will let you know when it comes in. We can share it. I read a little bit of the school law on line and it is very interesting. What are the chances our school board members have read it?

Title: Re: Cairo Stats - Why aren't we producing geniuses
Post by carla on Mar 16th, 2008 at 10:56pm

New Cairoite wrote on Mar 13th, 2008 at 2:02pm:
I am still searching for the statute. But, came across some other things.

Were you given a student discipline policy? Is there a parent-teacher advisory committee? Who is on it?


Yes, we are given the student handbook. Yes, there is a PTO, similar to a PTA, I guess. I need to find out who the contact person is for the PTO.

Title: Re: Cairo Stats - Why aren't we producing geniuses
Post by New Cairoite on Mar 17th, 2008 at 9:39am
Illinois law requires a parent-teacher advisory committee.

Maybe you can ask about it the next time you go up to the school. When I get the book on IL school law, I will read every word.

Requiring them to follow the law will be a good place to start. What are the chances any member of the school board have obtained a copy and read it?

I am going to not have access to the internet for a couple of weeks. :(

Title: Re: Cairo Stats - Why aren't we producing geniuses
Post by still_here on Mar 17th, 2008 at 12:09pm
Hope your withdraws aren’t too bad, a couple of weeks with no internet. Wow  [smiley=engel017.gif]

Title: Re: Cairo Stats - Why aren't we producing geniuses?
Post by pooh on Jun 26th, 2008 at 12:25am
First of all, let  me begin by saying that school uniforms is not going to make a difference in the education of our children. You claim that Cairo is in a poverty stricken area, so if parents/guardians are unable to purchase school supplies for their children what makes you think that they can afford uniforms! The children if not wanting to wear the uniforms are just going to find a way to rebel thus creating more discipline issues in the classroom. As a result of the discipline issues, lease teaching will be done.

As for the statement about Cairo not producing geniuses… Did you know that some people who have graduated from CHS has done great things with their live. On of my classmates has had three books that she wrote published! Next, have you ever spent a day in the teacher’s shoes? It is not all the teachers fault!

In order for education to be a success, it takes the combination of family, the school system, and the community working together. Most important, the student learning. Did you know that according to the theorist, Gardner, we have several different intelligences? As a result of this, everybody has a different learning style. This needs to be addressed in the classroom! The days where the teacher teaches from a book only should be gone, children need hands on experiences, a chance to get out in the community, and a chance to voice their own opinions. Nest, some teaching just so the children can score high on those end of the year tests. Some teachers teach only the material on the test.!

Nest in closing once again, it is not due to poverty or clothing as to our schools. The family unit, teachers, and community need to work together and get involved!  And one thought How many school board members actually visit the schools on a regular basis to see what is going on?

Title: Re: Cairo Stats - Why aren't we producing geniuses?
Post by still_here on Jun 26th, 2008 at 4:51am
Q. What is the purpose of having mandatory school uniforms?



A. Uniforms will help erase economic differences among students, and facilitates school pride because students see themselves as part of the school team.



Fewer absences, fewer tardies, and less truancy are reported by schools with mandatory school uniform policies which increases instructional time.



School uniforms help students see schools as a setting for teaching and learning, help set a tone for serious study and allow students to focus their attention on learning.



School uniforms have been shown to improve the safety of all students on our school campuses by reducing gang influence, minimizing violence by reducing some sources of conflict and helping to identify trespassers.

;)

Title: Re: Cairo Stats - Why aren't we producing geniuses?
Post by deckhand on Jun 26th, 2008 at 12:52pm
No they won't.

I remember wearing uniforms to school.  I also remember poor students wearing uniforms to school.  No "economic differences were erased," because the poor kids still remained poor, and the snobs still looked down on them.

Title: Re: Cairo Stats - Why aren't we producing geniuses?
Post by still_here on Jun 26th, 2008 at 1:12pm
True but with uniforms you only need 3 sets at the most to do you the whole year.   When a poor child wears the same shirt twice in one week every week they know the other kids are making fun of him.  This at least levels the field if just a little bit.  Now tennis shoes are another matter.

Title: Re: Cairo Stats - Why aren't we producing geniuses?
Post by deckhand on Jun 26th, 2008 at 2:03pm
And when a poor kid wears one of only 3 shirts that he owns to school dirty and torn--then the other kids also make fun of him.

I've personally seen it happen.  It's heartbreaking.

Title: Re: Cairo Stats - Why aren't we producing geniuses?
Post by pooh on Jun 26th, 2008 at 3:02pm
No matter what the children wear to school, there still are going to be those so called 'social clicks" wearing uniforms is just going to make everyone look the same and eliminate students being sent home for dress code violations! And then once again what happens to those who can not afford the uniforms and have no transportation to go get them? It's not like we have an abundance of stores around here. I wore uniforms to school for three years (ST Joe green ugh) and I hated it, and it did not stop other students from labeling others. My cousin who is nine had to wear uniforms this year to school, but ans they are costly. The code is plain dress paints, no carpenter pants, no hip huggers. polo shirts with collar and no emblem on the front. What schools need to do is focus on how to get students interested in learning and focus on that. Money needs to be spent on new books, building upkeep and funding for field trips. That's another issue that bothers me. Field trips. When I was in school, my parents did not have to pay for filed trips. Now, the school wants you to send money so your child can go on a field trip. If you do not send the money, your child simply does not go.  They are sent to another’s teacher's room which may be a grade below or above. I thought that is why the children have fundraisers to pay for the field trips.

Title: Re: Cairo Stats - Why aren't we producing geniuses?
Post by deckhand on Jun 26th, 2008 at 3:13pm
I agree with everything you've said, Pooh.

What I don't agree with is that BLUE ink.  It makes it too hard for my old eyes to read what you've written.  Please, write in black.

Title: Re: Cairo Stats - Why aren't we producing geniuses?
Post by still_here on Jun 26th, 2008 at 4:29pm
Wal-Mart has uniforms.  ;)

We'd have more money for extras if within the city limits we bought all the kids bikes to ride to school instead of busing them.   8-)

Have fewer obese kids also.  :)

Title: Re: Cairo Stats - Why aren't we producing geniuses?
Post by deckhand on Jun 26th, 2008 at 4:45pm
Yes, Walmart does.  They also have riding lawn mowers and flat screen tv's.  Your point?

Just who are the WE who will BUY these bikes for the kids?  And do you think they can ride them all the way over to Sikeston, Cape, or Paducah to buy their uniforms?!

Title: Re: Cairo Stats - Why aren't we producing geniuses?
Post by deckhand on Jun 26th, 2008 at 4:51pm
How to live in Still_Here's Utopia:

1. Just give em all uniforms...

2.  Then give em all bicycles...

Title: Re: Cairo Stats - Why aren't we producing geniuses?
Post by Ice-P on Jun 26th, 2008 at 5:08pm
Cairo IS one of the few places where buses run "in the city" for city schools.  Most rural schools use buses, but city schools don't.  Looks like a lot of money.  (Note:  I walked to school, yep, uphill both ways, the M.C. Escher school)  

Right now, the schools seem to be failing.  It can't hurt to try uniforms and classrooms with same-sex students.  Perhaps if the students BELIEVED that they could succeed, they would.  

I am all for the arts, but I also talked to a couple of students and they stated they needed more money for the arts.  They wanted to work on their "Rap".  Maybe if they beleived they could do something else, gangster rap wouldn't be so attractive.  

Title: Re: Cairo Stats - Why aren't we producing geniuses?
Post by deckhand on Jun 26th, 2008 at 5:20pm
M.C. Escher...he's the artist who did that painting of the alligators isn't he?  One following the other, dissolving into the other.  Tail into tail...

Well, you get the point.

Yes, the school buses 'run in the city'.  But that's because there are only 3 public schools and they're far apart.  They're not neighborhood schools within walking distance like the old days.  You can't expect students to walk all those blocks out to Cairo Jr. and Sr. High in whatever weather.  It's not right.  And you can't expect little kids to walk, maybe by themselves, all the way to either Emerson uptown or Bennett downtown.  That's crazy.  And dangerous, in this day and time.

Once there was Elmwood for the uptowners.  Lincoln for the middletowners.  Safford for the middle-downtowners.  And Douglas for the downtowners.  It made it easy for a kid to ride a bike or walk to school.

But the school system was segregated back then too.  So there was Garrison Elementary, Washington Jr. High, and Sumner High for the black students.  I don't think anyone wants to go back to those days.

Gangsta rap is a fad.  We had fads in our day.  Gangsta rap will fade out.  Trust me.  These kids will grow up and become adults--it's inevitable.

(Ice--you forgot to mention it was in the snow too!)






Title: Re: Cairo Stats - Why aren't we producing geniuses?
Post by PEABODY on Jun 26th, 2008 at 6:07pm
I went to cairo puplic schools in the 70', the buses ran only for grade schools,emerson and bennet.  the only ones rode for jr.high and high school lived in the county.

Title: Re: Cairo Stats - Why aren't we producing geniuses?
Post by Medic Ron on Jun 26th, 2008 at 6:27pm
You poor thing 8-)

Title: Re: Cairo Stats - Why aren't we producing geniuses?
Post by Medic Ron on Jun 26th, 2008 at 6:28pm
We must have went to different schools together in the 70's 8-)

Title: Re: Cairo Stats - Why aren't we producing geniuses?
Post by PEABODY on Jun 26th, 2008 at 7:51pm
you went to camalot,,,,,,I went to a REAL SCHOOL. ;D ;D ;D

Title: Re: Cairo Stats - Why aren't we producing geniuses?
Post by Medic Ron on Jun 26th, 2008 at 8:11pm
And it shows 8-)

Title: Re: Cairo Stats - Why aren't we producing geniuses?
Post by Ice-P on Jun 26th, 2008 at 9:52pm
(Note:  I walked to school, yep, uphill both ways, the M.C. Escher school)  

p.s. Neither rain, nor snow nor gloom of night could stop me from my appointed rounds.  I walked.

Title: Re: Cairo Stats - Why aren't we producing geniuses?
Post by deckhand on Jun 26th, 2008 at 10:36pm
How far, what year, what kind of neighborhood, what town, what state?
Ain't gonna happen like that again.

And you're pulling my leg.  :P  You can't walk BOTH ways UPHILL.  Either you first walk uphill, then downhill.  Or vice versa.  ::)

Title: Re: Cairo Stats - Why aren't we producing geniuses?
Post by Ice-P on Jun 26th, 2008 at 11:36pm
A long time ago, in the State of Illinois, in a small southern community, my sisters and I walked to school (Catholic) every day.  In fourth grade, I took band at the public school.  I walked 1 1/2 miles from home to public school in the morning (before school started) and then about 1 mile to school (missing Mass and sometimes part of one class).  I played a Baritone (small tuba) that I carried every day.  Since I was walking every day, I sometimes got rides with other band members that saw me walking, especially in the rain or snow.  Usually though, I went on my own as I wouldn't be late.  The town was about the size of Anna.  I walked from one end to the other.  My mom didn't drive (early 1960's) and Dad drove our only car to work.  There were 7 kids at home and if I wanted to take band, I walked.  I walked on the sidewalk thru the business district and residential areas to get to the schools.  

If you're 10 and carrying an instrument that is nearly as big as you are, after a couple blocks, EVERYTHING IS UPHILL!!!!

Tell me again how far apart the schools are in Cairo.  My wife and I were recently back in my old hometown and I showed her where our house "used to be" (it's gone now) then I drove to the school where I took band and back to the Catholic school.  She was impressed by how far it was.  

It is more dangerous now, but at that time, it was that or nothing.  When I got older (around 14), I got a bike.  My horn was strapped to the straddle bar.  It made curves  exciting!!!

Title: Re: Cairo Stats - Why aren't we producing geniuses?
Post by Ice-P on Jun 26th, 2008 at 11:50pm
I forgot, but part of band was sectional practice and solo practice.  Since I had to walk so far, I was always scheduled for practices right after band rehearsal.  Since the other kids were staying in school, I always walked from public school to Catholic school.  And walked home for lunch.  

Yep, it was a different time.  But they scrimped to get me lessons and a horn so I couldn't disappoint them.  I walked.  

In grade school, you practiced a lot.  When you got to High School, IF you made band (it was super competitive) the fun started.  Band trips, Marching band, parades, You got to go lots of places.  

I moved in the last 2 months of 8th grade and missed the fun.  The band I MIGHT  have been in was in the Rose Parade (yep), played on the steps on the Capital in D.C., and played half time of a major bowl game (don't remember which one).  Our high school marched in a lot of local parades but nothing like that.

But no hard feelings >:( >:( :D

Title: Re: Cairo Stats - Why aren't we producing geniuses?
Post by deckhand on Jun 27th, 2008 at 12:49am
You're right.  No hard feelings.  I'm sure the nuns that taught you (or was it brothers?) wouldn't like to think you harbored bad feelings against someone you disagreed with.  At least not the nuns and brothers and priests I've known.

No, I can't tell you "again" how far apart the schools are in Cairo.  I don't live there anymore.  I don't remember...

But I do remember Cairo once had a Catholic school, St. Joe.  I'm sorry to see it has closed.  A lot of my relatives attended that school.  Same are alive, but most are now dead.  That makes me sad. They were good decent people and I miss them.

So, Ice, cherish those memories you have.  Be grateful that you had the kind of parents that raised you.  A lot of children in Cairo--and elsewhere--don't have those kind of hardworking, sacrificing, religious parents.  As it stands now, over half of the children born in the US are born to unwed parents.  Walking to school is surely the least of their worries.

Title: Re: Cairo Stats - Why aren't we producing geniuses?
Post by deckhand on Jun 27th, 2008 at 12:52am
With your musical expertise, ever thought about starting a Dixieland jazz band in Cairo?  To play concerts at the Pavilion in St. Mary's Park?

Or how about offering to give lessons to some kid(s) who desperately wants to learn?  

We could then start to produce those geniuses that some say are lacking now.

Besides, I think you would make those nuns proud.  :)

Peace


Title: Re: Cairo Stats - Why aren't we producing geniuses?
Post by Ice-P on Jun 27th, 2008 at 1:46pm
One thing I got out of Catholic school that stays with me to this day:

I HATE NUNS!!!!

Also, it's been 35+ years since I played a musical instrument.  I wish I had taken guitar or piano.  But, back then, guitar was not popular and piano was for "girls".  

Title: Re: Cairo Stats - Why aren't we producing geniuses?
Post by deckhand on Jun 27th, 2008 at 2:33pm

Ice-P wrote on Jun 27th, 2008 at 1:46pm:
One thing I got out of Catholic school that stays with me to this day:

I HATE NUNS!!!!

Also, it's been 35+ years since I played a musical instrument.  I wish I had taken guitar or piano.  But, back then, guitar was not popular and piano was for "girls".  


If you ever get the chance, go see the play Nunsense. You'll find it very funny, I promise.

"Guitar was not popular."  Since when!?  I grew up in the 50s, 60s, and 70s.  It was always popular then.  I tried learning to play one myself.  Took piano instead.  But then, I'm a girl.  :)

Back on the topic of why we aren't producing geniuses.  I believe it starts in the home.  In my opinion, for a child to develop well, he needs a parent who reads, and reads to them.  I watched my parents reading, even if it was only the morning newspaper at the breakfast table.  (They did read other things.)  I instilled the love--and necessity-of reading in my own children.  I took them to the public library, read to them, let them see me reading.  Once I sat down and read Mitch Albom's book Tuesdays with Morrie in a single sitting, just so I could ask my daughter questions about it in preparation for a test.  I was glad I did. It's a wonderful story.

I read.  I also write.  And I have taught my kids to do the same.

The arts are important also.  I have a friend whose mother played piano.  This mother instilled her love of music in her daugher.

Another friend of mine's mother loved to sew, knit, and crochet.  And her daughter learned the same things.

Still another's dad loved to cook--and cooked delicious meals.  He taught his daughter how to cook delicious meals.

One friend of mine had parents who loved going to the Muni Opera in St. Louis. They took her with them. Sometimes they took me too. Their home was filled with Broadway Musical albums. I loved to visit that home and listen to those albums.  I think it's one of the reason I love show tunes today.

The government cannot be expected to do well what parents should do first, and that is to inspire.  The government cannot inspire.  It takes a parent to do that, whether it's one's own parents or a friend's parents or a teacher who acts as a parent.  

Inspiration's free too--for all those taxpayers worrying about how their money is being spent!



Title: Re: Cairo Stats - Why aren't we producing geniuses?
Post by pooh on Jun 28th, 2008 at 6:41pm
I agree children need to be exposed to reading as soon as they are born!!! It sets the stage for othere developmental goals they need to reach. By reading to a chidl, they hear the langauge being spoken, see how to handle a book, and see print. When the child is able to put it all togethr and realize that letters put togther to form words and that words have meanign and can be read, they will begin to be read to. Reading togther as a family should be done often. i read to my son when he was born and contined to do so. As a resulthe is going in the third grade and on a sixth grade reading level (that is what the school says) i believe this would not ahve been done wihtout me working with him at home.

As far as education, it does take the school, family, and community all working togther to benefit the children. But, the family has to be willing to work with the school. There are alot of barriers of why the family doeas not want to work with the school system, But, I feel as if, the educators in the school system needs to work to break down those barriers for the children so they can learn and be bettter prepared for the real life whne they gte out on thier own. which brings me to my next education topic that I am upset with, but I need to write my paper for college class that is due on Monday so i will post my issue soon! Oh, and please ingnore my typing errors, typing is one thing i did not take at school! :)

Title: Re: Cairo Stats - Why aren't we producing geniuses?
Post by pooh on Jun 28th, 2008 at 8:52pm
Okay now I have time to finish what I wanted to say. I was glad that the school system brought back activities. Meaning library, physical education, art, and music. These all should be extensions of the teaching that is going on in the classroom, not just time for the teacher to take a break(which they probably need). It also gives the students a break from the same old classroom and the teaching from a book (which needs to be changed based on Gardner’s theory of multiple intelligences.)  However, do you really know what goes in in these activities?  Well, I do and I did not like it one bit!

Take P.E.:

If I had a dollar for everyday my son came home and said he played dodge ball or watched some kids play basketball, I would be rich. Even on the days it was nice and sunny our, all they did was dodge ball. What happened to teaching our children team games with rules and regulations? My son did not even know what kick ball was when we went to our family reunion. These children need to be taught how to work together as a team and how to follow rules. This can be done in a fun way  through P.E. class. The only team activities around here are upward soccer, upward basketball, and rotary ball (when you can get the coach to return your calls so you can sighn your child up). All of the above have one thing in common, it takes money, and transportation. Think about where we live, everybody does not have the funds to let their child play these sports and the transportation to take them. So why is it that all they learn in PE is the violent sport of dodge ball where it is one on one and a violent sport. What happened to the Presidents Physical Challenge you used to take twice a year in PE?

Library:

All my son told me and I viewed is they watched a movie and got tolistento a book, Now that does promote some literacy, but do they know what a Dewey Decimal System is? The different kinds of books and have read each different kind? I know they checked out books, but they had to stay at school. What happened to parent involvement? Bringing the books home would have been great to read as a family and then for the child to write a book report. Bringing the book home and returning it teaches responsibility.

Music:
Ms. Neely does a great job, I was very impressed when my son brought home homework with the different types of music notes and had to draw and label them. But what happened to band at Bennett School?  What happened to the band room and all the instr

Title: Re: Cairo Stats - Why aren't we producing geniuses?
Post by happybunny on Jun 29th, 2008 at 11:59am
I am in total agreement with you.  If the parents don't put any effort into educating their children and just expect the school system to do it all then how can the children to do well?  Even working parents can spend 30 minutes at bedtime reading to their children.  The school system cannot do everything.  I agree with you also that the parents need to advocate more for their children.  If they see that their child is not doing well or not getting what they need in order to succeed they need to push through every bit of red tape to get what they deserve for their child.  It's not always easy to do, but in the end it will be worth it.

Title: Re: Cairo Stats - Why aren't we producing geniuses?
Post by Ice-P on Jun 29th, 2008 at 12:32pm
'"Guitar was not popular."  Since when!?  I grew up in the 50s, 60s, and 70s.  It was always popular then.  I tried learning to play one myself.  Took piano instead.  But then, I'm a girl.'

How about, in the early 60's, just as the Beatles were getting popular, there were NO guitar music teachers in my small town.  Just Band or Piano.  Playing guitar may have been popular, teaching it was not.  

"What happened to teaching our children team games with rules and regulations?"

I would have loved to learn some games that I might use in later life, golf, bowling, table tennis.  (Not gonna mention shuffleboard).  I'm too old for basketball, dodge ball or any other type of contact/running sport now.  

Title: Re: Cairo Stats - Why aren't we producing geniuses?
Post by redboy on Feb 6th, 2009 at 11:31am
I think it would be a great idea to have a Father=Daughter dance. It would encourage fathers here to take and spend some time with their daughters, and it would give the daughters a chance to have an evening with their dads. This would be a great thing for the Cavalier Club to sponsor and the Starlighters could have a sale of second hand formals for the girls to wear. What do you'all think?

Title: Re: Cairo Stats - Why aren't we producing geniuses?
Post by still_here on Feb 6th, 2009 at 11:43am

redboy wrote on Feb 6th, 2009 at 11:31am:
I think it would be a great idea to have a Father=Daughter dance. It would encourage fathers here to take and spend some time with their daughters, and it would give the daughters a chance to have an evening with their dads. This would be a great thing for the Cavalier Club to sponsor and the Starlighters could have a sale of second hand formals for the girls to wear. What do you'all think?


Great!  What about having it after prom so they could re-wear their dress one more time or younger girls could make over their older sister's dress

Title: Re: Cairo Stats - Why aren't we producing geniuses?
Post by missing-cairo on Feb 6th, 2009 at 7:01pm
Redboy,   I think you've come up with a walloping, wonderful idea.  Sell it, girl!

Maybe someone like Coke or Pepsi would be willing to kick in some sponsor money.

Title: Re: Cairo Stats - Why aren't we producing geniuses?
Post by deckhand on Feb 7th, 2009 at 11:27pm

still_here wrote on Feb 6th, 2009 at 11:43am:

redboy wrote on Feb 6th, 2009 at 11:31am:
I think it would be a great idea to have a Father=Daughter dance. It would encourage fathers here to take and spend some time with their daughters, and it would give the daughters a chance to have an evening with their dads. This would be a great thing for the Cavalier Club to sponsor and the Starlighters could have a sale of second hand formals for the girls to wear. What do you'all think?


Great!  What about having it after prom so they could re-wear their dress one more time or younger girls could make over their older sister's dress


That's a good idea Still Here.  Several years ago I brought some of my daughters prom dresses up to Cairo and donated them to the Daystar Thrift Store.  Figured she wouldn't wear them again, and I hated keeping them in her closet collecting dust.

I would encourage anyone to do the same.  If you're not going to wear it again (and most girls usually don't), for goodness sakes, let someone else.

This isn't really a father-daughter dance per se, but I distinctly remember dancing with my dad at the Magnolia Ball when I was a contestant way back when.

And when my own daughter was in dancing school, her teacher organized a father/daughter dance number to the tune of Ballerina Girl by Lionel Richie.  It was charming...she is her purple-sashed tutu and slippers, her father in his purple silk bowtie and cumberbun.

Title: Re: Cairo Stats - Why aren't we producing geniuses?
Post by missing-cairo on Feb 8th, 2009 at 11:55am
I'm thinking that if some  girl might not get to join in because her daddy doesn't  have the clothes, that it might be a good idea to consider an old-fashioned sock hop.....she still gets to feel special, the menu could be sloppy joes, chips, etc, and the cost is minimal all the way around.    Also, make sure it is understood that it is okay  for a grandpa, uncle or some other man to substitute for daddy.

Title: Re: Cairo Stats - Why aren't we producing geniuses?
Post by deckhand on Feb 8th, 2009 at 12:46pm
You're so right.  Your idea seems more feasible in these financial times to have a sock hop.

I was in the beauty shop a couple of weeks ago, and saw a little girl about 8 getting her hair done.  Her waiting mom explained to me as I was waiting that her daughter was going to a father/daughter dance at her private school...complete with a limo ride.  It blew my mind...hiring a chauffeured limo to drive a little girl to a school dance!

YES. I like your idea much better.  :)

Title: Re: Cairo Stats - Why aren't we producing geniuses?
Post by redboy on Feb 8th, 2009 at 1:51pm
Yes I also like the idea of a sock hop. I will go up  the high school and see if I can build a fire under somebody.

Title: Re: Cairo Stats - Why aren't we producing geniuses?
Post by deckhand on Feb 8th, 2009 at 1:52pm
Now don't get me wrong, people are free to spend their money anyway they choose.  I just can't help wondering if the nuns would have condoned daddy in a rented tux and prepubescent daughter in a ball gown, riding in a limousine to a dance at their school (yes, this is a Catholic grade school I'm talking about) if THEY were still in charge.

Title: Re: Cairo Stats - Why aren't we producing geniuses?
Post by redboy on Feb 8th, 2009 at 2:01pm
I don't think St. Joe ever had a dance that I can think of. They did around the final years of the school. I remember dancing with my son...Sister Bernadine would never allow it.  But we did have some awesome carnivals in the gym...

Title: Re: Cairo Stats - Why aren't we producing geniuses?
Post by deckhand on Feb 8th, 2009 at 2:43pm
Well, no.  Not in our days there.  But you have to remember at one time St. Joe had a high school, so I'm sure they had dances.  Don't imagine they were forbidden.  The archdiosese closed the high school in the early 50's.  My aunt graduated from there, but her younger brother had to attend CHS.  I'm told he was so mad about St. Joe High closing in his eighth-grade year--that he wrote the Pope!

And being roughly the same age as you Redboy, I remember going to many a Friday night sock hop at St. Raphael's Catholic School in Mounds--before and after it closed as a school.

Come to think about it, St. Joe did have some pretty hot-to-trot young boys in those days.  Maybe Sister Bernadine didn't want to be blamed for anything that might happen at a SJS dance.  (But we just went to Oriac dances instead.  *wink*)

But you're right, those carnivals were awesome.  The ones I attended were held in October, kinda St. Joe's answer to a Halloween party.

The Halloween parades down Elm and over to Washington Avenue put on by Lincoln Grade School were pretty awesome too.

Title: Re: Cairo Stats - Why aren't we producing geniuses?
Post by missing-cairo on Feb 10th, 2009 at 10:18am

redboy wrote on Feb 8th, 2009 at 1:51pm:
Yes I also like the idea of a sock hop. I will go up  the high school and see if I can build a fire under somebody.


Well,  as usual, my mind kicks in when I wake up of a morning.  Not to be a wet blanket, but it dawns on me we are not considering the fact that in this day and time there are any number of single parent homes in which the father plays absolutely no role or, as was the case for  my children and at least four or five of their friends, the father is deceased.    Maybe something like a wonderful mother/daughter brunch would be even more feasible and also relatively inexpensive to pull off.   What do you think?

Then you could also do something for the boys or maybe find a man who would spearhead an activity for them.

Title: Re: Cairo Stats - Why aren't we producing geniuses?
Post by still_here on Feb 10th, 2009 at 10:42am
That's were your boys & girls clubs would kick in or big brother & sister groups.  

Title: Re: Cairo Stats - Why aren't we producing geniuses?
Post by deckhand on Feb 10th, 2009 at 10:45pm

still_here wrote on Feb 10th, 2009 at 10:42am:
That's were your boys & girls clubs would kick in or big brother & sister groups.  


I agree.  Boys & Girls Clubs are great.  Think the nearest one to Cairo though is in Carbondale.

Mother/Daughter teas or luncheons are neat too.  When I taught special ed junior high school level, the students would raise money by doing laundry for single teachers (our classroom was equipped with a w/d and iron/board.)  One dollar a load.  The money they raised would then be used to purchase the supplies for a real nice Mother's Day tea.  Since our classroom had a kitchen, the students prepared all the food ( made finger sandwiches, baked cookies & cupcakes, mixed up the punch, and brewed the coffee and tea).  One of the other teachers brought in her silver tea set and lace table cloth, and the students set out the table, including flowers.  It was so nice and so special for all involved.

Oh yeah.  And each student presented his/her mother or significant other (grandmother, aunt, etc.) with a corsage.

I remember one student (a boy named Willie)...and here I get emotional... who didn't have anyone coming to the tea as his guest. So the female principal came down to our classroom as his special guest.  Willie met her at the door and pinned a corsage on her, like all the other students did for their guests, and then escorted her to the table and served her food and drink.

The kindness shown to those students--and by those students--was heartwarming.  It gave me hope that the world could be a better place if we all just took time to get along with each other, whatever our differences.

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