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Gender Matters: Dividing Boys & Girls (Read 13646 times)
still_here
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Gender Matters: Dividing Boys & Girls
Jan 17th, 2008 at 5:05pm
 
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Bobby do you think this would help our schools?
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still_here
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Re: Gender Matters: Dividing Boys & Girls
Reply #1 - Jan 17th, 2008 at 5:20pm
 
It would be interesting to see if something so simple as this would turn our schools around. In the urban areas your elite schools are usually always segregated by gender. Wink

Also why don't you stop averaging grades to see if they can play sports, ect. and just make it like it was years ago. Only A / B or C's could participate no D's or E's allowed. As it is now they make an A in PE then an E in math and still play sports. Angry

Why just think of where Ice-P and Medic could be today if they had gone to all boy schools. Roll Eyes
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Bobby
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Re: Gender Matters: Dividing Boys & Girls
Reply #2 - Jan 17th, 2008 at 5:34pm
 
I am not a fan of schools divided by sex, or of using "Gender" when "Sex" is the correct word. I know, the media does it all the time - to the point that the difference is all but meaningless.

I am also pretty sure that No Pass - No Play is in effect. I know that Cairo lost a player becuase he failed a class.

I have mixed feelings on No Pass - No Play. I can see rare occurances where an athlete might not take a tougher class just to make the easier grade. Sometimes people challenge themselves with a class that is just too tough for them.

Nope, I don't think it would happen very often.

The words in the phrase "Student-Athlete" are in the correct order...
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Ice-P
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Re: Gender Matters: Dividing Boys & Girls
Reply #3 - Jan 17th, 2008 at 11:33pm
 
I don't think it would help much because there is too much emphasis on sports.... I was a student-athlete, but a better student than an athlete.  I ended up as a math tutor in college.  One of the best basketball players in the area played for a large school for a year and then transferred to my school.  They gave me the task of "helping" him with algebra.  He couldn't add and subtract, so algebra was basically out.  While I was talking to him, I found out that he could only print, not write in cursive.  And he graduated from high school!!!!

No pass-No play is a joke when the great athletes "have to" pass. How can anyone not learn how to add numbers or make/receive change after 12 years of school. Embarrassed

And Still-Here, I went to a Catholic school..... it might as well have been all boys. 

p.s.  I still hate nuns!! Angry
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Re: Gender Matters: Dividing Boys & Girls
Reply #4 - Jan 18th, 2008 at 12:08am
 
Ice-P, I think things are a little better now.  Schools at all levels, even major Division 1 universities, hold academics in higher regard for athletes.  Some of the schools have had to be forced to do it by NCAA rules, of course.

But there have always been serious students that were also athletes.  When I was in college, there was a seven foot basketball player that was a senior in athletic eligibility, but a Graduate Student in the Physics Department academically.

Currently both Cairo and Meridian have basketball players that are also excellent students, including, arguably, the best players on each team.

I had a classmate in high school who was a first team all-state basketball player and was also Salutatorian of my class.

Certainly, even with the more rigorous academic standards by the NCAA, there are still athletes who major in eligibility.  There are also high school kids who probably put more emphasis on academics only because they want to play sports - which isn't necessarily a bad thing.
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Ice-P
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Re: Gender Matters: Dividing Boys & Girls
Reply #5 - Jan 18th, 2008 at 2:49pm
 
Maybe things have changed, it's been a long time since high school.  BUT, with the new testing for steroids in high school athletes, I have to believe that there is STILL a problem.  Girl friends writing papers or buying papers to pass classes was common.  Take-home tests.  Bonus points for "work" done after class.  It was pretty easy to get someone through classes.  And after all was said and done, the athlete was the cheated one.  And in college, cars and summer jobs gave them time and money to spend on "passing classes". 

Not saying that ALL do it, but if you emphasize sports, you downplay studies.  If someone believes that there only claim to fame is sports, that is what they'll concentrate on.  I know people that got thru high school and college on their ability to throw and run but couldn't read a book.  And the failure is in the schools.  If they don't HAVE TO LEARN, they won't.
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still_here
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Re: Gender Matters: Dividing Boys & Girls
Reply #6 - Jan 18th, 2008 at 3:18pm
 
I agree Ice-P. Sad

I just thought separating the girls from the boys would be a cheap ideal for the Cairo schools to try. I believe they already have a least two classes for each grade. They could also have different lunch times. The state may also give us a grant to try it out. Undecided

We have got to do something to improve what we have now.

Ice-P where did you go to school that was made up of mostly boys?
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Ice-P
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Re: Gender Matters: Dividing Boys & Girls
Reply #7 - Jan 18th, 2008 at 5:51pm
 
A little town, up north about 100 miles, where I lived before I moved down here.  Mostly boys and the girls were "good" girls.  It was a Catholic grade school and I wasn't that interested in girls at that time.  Later, when I became more interested in girls, I found out that I was a "dork".  So both Catholic and non-Catholic girls could ignore me. 

I started to move to Arkansas to double my chances of getting a date.  (You know what they say, Friday is your day in the dress so your chances of getting asked out really improve.)  I never got that desperate.  But I did check.
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carla
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Re: Gender Matters: Dividing Boys & Girls
Reply #8 - Feb 1st, 2008 at 5:36pm
 
It is optimal to have kids divided by sex, but not affordable. Different lunch times is a novel idea. I spent my lunch hour in junior high in the library. The librarian at CHS is doing that for the females but not the males. I'd like to see the library open to all during lunch. My librarian recommended some great books over the years. And, she got free help from the kids...even if it was only removing the inserts from magazines.

One thing Cairo can and should do is switch to uniforms!
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still_here
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Re: Gender Matters: Dividing Boys & Girls
Reply #9 - Feb 1st, 2008 at 5:44pm
 
What about grants to try?  If it improves our grade scores it would be a plus for all of IL.
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still_here
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Re: Gender Matters: Dividing Boys & Girls
Reply #10 - Feb 1st, 2008 at 5:52pm
 
We could be a "pilot" program.  Grin Grin Grin
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Ice-P
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Re: Gender Matters: Dividing Boys & Girls
Reply #11 - Feb 2nd, 2008 at 7:39am
 
Heck, it can't hurt.  Uniforms and gendered classes might make learning easier.  But, I still think if someone doesn't WANT to go to school and learn, NO ONE can make them.
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still_here
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Re: Gender Matters: Dividing Boys & Girls
Reply #12 - Feb 2nd, 2008 at 8:37am
 
It's called "inspire" them to learn. If you don't have to worry about how cool you look lying back in your chair, you may sit up and compete with the other boys for good grades. No one wants to appear to be a dork in front of girls but with some it just comes natural. Wink
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Ice-P
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Re: Gender Matters: Dividing Boys & Girls
Reply #13 - Feb 3rd, 2008 at 9:32am
 
"Dorkdom" comes naturally to some people.  And, once you accept it, you can take hard classes and get good grades and not worry about being cool.  Cause it ain't happnin'!!!!!!

Inspire to learn is a great idea.  It takes more than uniforms and gender classes.  It takes families and great teachers and motivated students.  "Failure is not an option!"
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carla
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Re: Gender Matters: Dividing Boys & Girls
Reply #14 - Mar 12th, 2008 at 9:06am
 
From the Christian Science Monitor...

Chicago looks to 'turnarounds' to lift failing schools

The unproven reform includes firing a school's entire staff.

By Amanda Paulson | Staff writer of The Christian Science Monitor

Chicago

It looks like a typical day at a typical American grammar school: Students proceed in single file down hallways, a class of fourth-graders listens to their teacher read aloud, and students in another class work in small groups on independent projects.

But Andre Cowling, the tall, imposing new principal of Harvard Elementary on Chicago's South Side, shakes his head in wonder at it all. Last year, he says, "this wouldn't have been possible."

Harvard is one of several public schools here to get a top-to-bottom housecleaning in recent years including replacing the principal and most teachers in a bid to lift student achievement out of the nation's academic basement. The drastic approach is known as "turnaround," and Chicago is embracing it more than any US city, though it's unproven and is controversial among teachers, many parents, and students.

"It's risky in that it's new and has an untested track record," says Andrew Calkins, senior vice president at Mass Insight, a nonprofit group focused on school reform, and coauthor of a report on turnaround schools. "It's logical in that the other choice is to keep on doing what's been tried before, and we know what the results of that will be. What you try to do if you're Chicago is to minimize the risk and maximize the possibility of a good outcome" by thinking through everything that's needed to improve the climate for learning at a school.

Continued below....
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